Journal cover Journal topic
Web Ecology An open-access peer-reviewed journal
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 1.560 IF 1.560
  • IF 5-year value: 1.117 IF 5-year
    1.117
  • CiteScore value: 2.3 CiteScore
    2.3
  • SNIP value: 0.459 SNIP 0.459
  • SJR value: 0.41 SJR 0.41
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 16 Scimago H
    index 16
Volume 2, issue 1
Web Ecol., 2, 32–37, 2001
https://doi.org/10.5194/we-2-32-2001
© Author(s) 2001. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Web Ecol., 2, 32–37, 2001
https://doi.org/10.5194/we-2-32-2001
© Author(s) 2001. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  06 Jun 2001

06 Jun 2001

Impacts of non-native Norway spruce plantation on abundance and species richness of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

Z. Elek1, T. Magura2, and T. Tóthmérész1 Z. Elek et al.
  • 1Ecological Institute, Debrecen Univ., Debrecen, P.O. Box 71, 4010, Hungary
  • 2Dept. of Zoology, Debrecen Univ., Debrecen, P.O. Box 3, 4010, Hungary

Abstract. The impacts of non-native Norway spruce plantation on the abundance and species richness of carabids were studied in the Bükk National Park in Hungary, central Europe. Pitfall catches from recently established (5 yr old), young (15 yr after planting), middle-aged (30 yr after planting), old Norway spruce Picea abies plantation (50 yr after planting), and a native submontane beech forest (Fagetum sylvaticae) as a control stand were compared.

Our results showed that deciduous forest species decreased significantly in abundance in the plantations, and appeared in high abundance only in the native beech forest. Furthermore, open habitat species increased remarkably in abundance in the recently established plantation. Carabids were significantly more abundant and species rich in the native forest than in the plantations, while differences were not significant among the plantations. Multiple regression between the abundance and species richness of carabids and twelve environmental measurements showed that pH of the soil, herb cover and density of the carabids’ prey had a significant effect in determining abundance and species richness.

Our results showed that plantation of non-native Norway spruce species had a detrimental effect on the composition of carabid communities and no regeneration could be observed during the growth of plantations even 50 yr after the establishment. This emphasises the importance of an active nature management practice to facilitate the recolonization of the native species.

Publications Copernicus
Download
Citation