Articles | Volume 22, issue 2
Web Ecol., 22, 47–58, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/we-22-47-2022
Web Ecol., 22, 47–58, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/we-22-47-2022
Standard article
13 Jul 2022
Standard article | 13 Jul 2022

Lengthening of the growth season, not increased water availability, increased growth of Picea likiangensis var. rubescens plantations on eastern Tibetan Plateau due to climate change

Yu Feng et al.

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Cited articles

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Short summary
We conducted a study on the response of plantation forests to climate change in the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Our study combined dendrochronology (basal area increment, BAI) and remote sensing (normalized difference vegetation index, NDVI) and found that tree growth was significantly correlated with drought index and temperature, and there was a significant positive correlation between BAI and NDVI. NDVI can be used to study the response of plantations to climate change.