Articles | Volume 18, issue 1
https://doi.org/10.5194/we-18-105-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/we-18-105-2018
Standard article
 | 
19 Jun 2018
Standard article |  | 19 Jun 2018

Do mycorrhizal fungi create below-ground links between native plants and Acacia longifolia? A case study in a coastal maritime pine forest in Portugal

Pedro Carvalho, Rui Martins, António Portugal, and M. Teresa Gonçalves

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Latest update: 24 Jul 2024
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Short summary
Maritime pine forests are a major ecosystem throughout the Portuguese coast and are severely affected by Acacia longifolia invasion. The presented study investigated the diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi of major plant species in these ecosystems to find possible links between them. We successfully identified 13 fungal taxa and common taxa between all plant species. The finding that Acacia shares symbionts with native plant species is a new facet of its invasive ecology.