Articles | Volume 24, issue 1
https://doi.org/10.5194/we-24-35-2024
https://doi.org/10.5194/we-24-35-2024
Short communication
 | 
19 Mar 2024
Short communication |  | 19 Mar 2024

Short communication: Problems of classifying predator-induced prey immobility – an unexpected case of post-contact freezing

Teresita N. Ulate Gómez, Antonia E. Welch, and Winfried S. Peters

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Short summary
Prey noticing a predator may freeze (turn immobile) to avoid detection. Freezing is generally thought to precede predator–prey contact, but this may not hold for species of limited sensory abilities. The snail Agaronia detects its prey Pachyoliva, another snail, only when it is right before the predator, while Pachyoliva bumping into Agaronia's side avoids detection by freezing. This post-contact freezing reminds us to consider sensory capabilities when interpreting predator–prey interactions.